In sports competitions, is it more important to win or to practice good sportsmanship? Sportsmanship is defined as ethical, appropriate, polite and fair behavior while participating in a game or athletic event. Good sportsmanship is when you are willing to sacrifice personal goals in favor of team goals. When you are always looking to help a teammate look good. When an athlete is willing to accept a role as a secondary or substitute player if it will help the team be more successful.

    In sports competitions, is it more important to win or to practice good sportsmanship? Sportsmanship is defined as ethical, appropriate, polite and fair behavior while participating in a game or athletic event. Good sportsmanship is when you are willing to sacrifice personal goals in favor of team goals.  When you are always looking to help a teammate look good.  When an athlete is willing to accept a role as a secondary or substitute player if it will help the team be more successful.

   You can balance winning and good sportsmanship, if you show good sportsmanship you are always a winner. Make sure to always set a good example young kids are always watching you and they tend to want to follow in your footsteps. Make sure you respect others around you including coaches and parents. They are there to help and support you, not shut you down. While winning may not be everything, it sure is a great confidence boost! There’s nothing more valuable than feeling good about yourself, and winning is the easiest way to build self-confidence.That’s because winning is validating, by winning, you know you did what you were supposed to do. Winning keeps you excited to continue playing and to continue winning.

    But winning isn’t everything. What’s the bad part of losing? Well, that’s pretty simple … losing! No one wants to lose because no one wants to feel bad. And losing constantly has the ability to turn you off from a sport for good.

    Does winning feel better than losing? Of course! Is losing the end of the world? Far from it. Winning isn’t everything and losing doesn’t have to be either.
    
    Nicholls is enrolled in Kristi Swanson’s communications and broadcasting course at CHS.