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Crookston Times - Crookston, MN
Anyone who knows Eric knows that he writes about a little bit of everything, whether it's taking a trip down memory lane, or praising and/or criticizing something or someone.
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About this blog
By Eric Bergeson
Since 1997, Eric has owned and operated Bergeson Nursery, rural Fertile, MN, a business his grandfather started in 1937. With the active participation of his parents, who owned the business for the previous twenty five years, and his younger brother ...
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Eric Bergeson's The Country Scribe
Since 1997, Eric has owned and operated Bergeson Nursery, rural Fertile, MN, a business his grandfather started in 1937. With the active participation of his parents, who owned the business for the previous twenty five years, and his younger brother Joe, who is now president of the company, the business has nearly tripled in size during Ericís ownership tenure. The holder of a Master of Arts in History from the University of North Dakota, Eric has taught courses in history and political science at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. He is also an adjunct lecturer in history for Hamline University, St. Paul, MN. Ericís hobbies include Minnesota Twins baseball, Bach organ music, bookstores, hiking, photography, singing old country music with his brother Joe, and watching the wildlife on the swamp in front of his house eight miles outside of Fertile, Minn.
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Aug. 5, 2014 12:01 a.m.


Pardon my infrequent entries into the weblog. It has been a busy time. When I look at the number of places I have to reach before Nov. 4, I get overwhelmed, and I am really not comfortable in the morning until I am out hitting the pavement.
And that, I enjoy it more by the day.
Yesterday in East Grand Forks, I ended up swinging through the highest-income areas and the lowest income areas. I went through some very sobering apartment buildings. I knocked on some double oak doors on mansions next to the prairie.
People have been kind.
The most universal experience: Knock, knock. Dog goes absolutely nuts. If there is no "shut up!" yelled at the dog, I know nobody is home. I hang my pamphlet on the door and move on. If I hear yelling at the dog, then I prepare for the battle to keep the dog from escaping through the crack when the door opens. I offer my pamphlet quickly to give the house owner the option of just grabbing it and going back inside to calm the dog (or dogs). Usually, they manage to step outside for a quick chat. Other times, the dog (or dogs) escape. Chase ensues. 
Other random observations: 
•Some housing developments have good doorbells, other developments and subdivisions (and this has apparently nothing to do with the age of the development) have worthless doorbells which almost never work. You know how the plastic on those doorbells gets yellow, brittle and breaks? I confess I have broken the plastic presser bar on at least six doorbells in the past week.  
•I have come across several senior citizens with dementia who are staying with their children, who aren't home. I can imagine that is common. 
•People love their flowers. I have been truly impressed with the gardening ability of people across all income levels. But oh, how they could use some peat to soften that hard ground. I do not bring that up.
•I have gotten several yard tours. I enjoy them all. 
•I have heard a few sad stories, from people young and old. 
•I prefer to knock doors in the day, from 10 to about 3. By then, I am tired. Today, I had a radio show first, so didn't get started until 1 p.m. I made it until almost 5 before tiring out in the heat. I knocked over 100 doors. An average of 31 percent of the people were home, which is good.
•Tomorrow afternoon, the Speaker of the House is coming to knock doors with me in Crookston. I am a little nervous!

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