|
|
Crookston Times - Crookston, MN
  • Editorial: Supreme Court errs on decision on contraception coverage in the workplace

  • In a 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court recently made a social statement with the ruling that certain types of corporations and businesses cannot be required to provide contraception coverage to their employees. This decision has been discussed, dissected and viewed through a fairly black and white religiously-inspired lens and has been the topic of controversy and debate among many.
    • email print
      Comment
  •     In a 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court recently made a social statement with the ruling that certain types of corporations and businesses cannot be required to provide contraception coverage to their employees. This decision has been discussed, dissected and viewed through a fairly black and white religiously-inspired lens and has been the topic of controversy and debate among many.    
        The Supreme Court’s ruling gives businesses the opportunity to twist and turn the blanket statement and unconscious liberty to create laws that could be hurtful to women, families and Americans.   
        While it is true that contraceptives-- including birth control, plan b and the day after pill, to name a few-- prevent a fertilized egg from growing into a human baby, is it true that this is a form of abortion? Depending on your religious point of view, the answer could be either a firm yes or a strong no, or even a rare hybrid of something in between. 
        If the Supreme Court is definite in their split decision on the enforcement of giving businesses contraceptive liberties, should businesses also have the power to cover things such as vasectomies and Viagra? Is this not an epic contradiction? Or merely a gender-dominant norm in a culture that prizes certain individuals over others? 
        Contraceptives – specifically birth control – are not only used for the sole purpose of preventing pregnancy. In fact, 58% of women were cited with responding they use birth control for reasons other than prevention, including reducing cramps and menstrual pain, preventing migraines along with other menstruation side effects and treating acne.    
        So now that the question of "Do we have to?" has been answered, the next question is this: How long will it take before this decision is questioned under scathing criticism and review? Will a new decision be forcibly made due to the unhappiness of others? Only time will tell.

        calendar