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Crookston Times - Crookston, MN
  • Editorial: Cheers and Jeers

  • Cheers to Minnesota's shopping options and Jeers to pricey and constricting smartphone contracts
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  • Cheers...to Minnesota’s shopping options   
        Minnesota does not adopt the "Blue Law" for their Sunday store hours like North Dakota does. Shoppers around the region thank them for that. It brings more business into the “Land of 10,000 Lakes” and we won't complain.
        For those who are unfamiliar with the "Blue Law,” the state of North Dakota doesn't allow its retail stores to be open from midnight to noon on Sundays to allow more family time (or church time) for their employees.
        According to Wikipedia, "North Dakota may have the strictest remaining blue law of the United States." North Dakota is, however, still able to have grocery stores and gas stations open.
        Before a blizzard in 1991, North Dakotan pharmacies, hospitals and restaurants were not allowed to be open on Sundays before noon. Changes were made after citizens pointed out that they needed access to those places and they should not be included in the legislation.  
        There are a lot of North Dakotans, especially from Grand Forks, that flock to Minnesota for some Sunday shopping after breakfast or church. Particularly, East Grand Forks stores see big money from people across the river and Canadians staying in the area for the weekend.
        North Dakota can keep its "Blue Law" and Minnesota will gladly accept their Sunday morning business.
                                                                               – Jess Bengtson
    Jeers...to pricey and constricting
    smartphone contracts    
        The time has come. After months and months that have now added up to multiple years, it is finally time to upgrade your beloved, outdated smartphone and trade it in for the latest and greatest model that, in reality, can do the same basic functions for an even greater price.
         Gadget geeks, along with the rest of us, have realized that Fortune 500 phone providers, such as Verizon, Sprint, and AT&T to name a few, are in the business more for the financial aspect than for their customer support and feedback.
        It can be and is extremely difficult to upgrade smartphones without spending gargantuan amounts of money – whether it's up front or in the long run through binding contracts and fees. The process becomes even more difficult when upgrading from a basic phone to a smartphone.
    Page 2 of 2 -     Add these factors to the number of phones under your contract, how much data you think you will need to last all of the numbers for a single month and the means to pay for it all and you’ve most likely spent more money than you ever imagined on a gadget that has revolutionized the world while gripping its consumers in its pricey hands.
        It’s important to be able to upgrade to the newest and fastest technology if you have the means and so desire to do so.
        It’s should not, however, be acceptable to charge and/or pay ridiculous and pricy amounts to do so.  
                                                  – Torrie Greer, student staff writer

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