Tuesday's Polk County Board of Commissioners meeting got a little heated when Chuck Whiting, Polk County administrator, and Linsey Rood, Polk County Human Resources
coordinator, asked for approval of adding an administration internship.

    Tuesday's Polk County Board of Commissioners meeting got a little heated when Chuck Whiting, Polk County administrator, and Linsey Rood, Polk County Human Resources coordinator, asked for approval of adding an administration internship. The board denied their request after some discussion on the salary and specific duties for the proposed intern.

    The initial proposal gave the intern $10 per hour for 20 to 22 hours a week, which coincided with the intern's school schedule. Rood explained how a male student from the University of North Dakota working on his master's degree in Public Administration approached her and Whiting, offering himself up for an internship for the next six or seven months. Rood had a detailed example of duties the intern could help with laid out for the board to view, but board members didn't think that would suffice.

    Later on in the meeting, board members revisited the subject.
They asked if the intern would work for free or if Whiting could come back to the board at another time with a different proposal. Whiting said he would rather approach the board at a later time than expect the intern to drive from Grand Forks for free.

Still no bids on Professional Building property

    After waiting until the bid deadline of 11 a.m., Rob Wagner, director of Assessments Services, announced the county, for the second time in as many attempts to auction the land, did not receive any bids for the land on 7th Street home to the Professional Building until it was demolished earlier this year. Wagner said they did have some calls with questions asking about possible townhomes being constructed on the property, since there is space for approximately six lots.

    "It has been five weeks since we first advertised the property;
evidently it is not going to sell for $50,000," Wagner told
the board. "Maybe we can hold it for a while and put it back
up for sale."

    Commissioner Warren Affeldt suggested the possibility of
retaining a real estate agent to help with the sale of the land.
To that, Wagner offered up taking the commission out of the
total asking price. Others on the board mentioned that someone
might come out of nowhere wanting to buy the property
so they should hold off. They agreed to wait and possibly talk
to the state about lowering the asking price.

    The Crookston Housing & Economic Development Authority (CHEDA) has been interested in the property since the county made it available. CHEDA Executive Director Craig Hoiseth, CHEDA board members and city officials think the property could potentially be an ideal location for a handful of single-family homes built by Crookston High School construction trades students, as part of an ongoing collaboration with CHEDA and a local contractor. But
Hoiseth has said he thinks the $50,000 minimum bid is a bit steep. The CHEDA board met in closed session last Thursday to discuss whether or not to meet the minimum bid requirement in Tuesday's auction.