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Crookston Times - Crookston, MN
  • Winger boy with rare blood disorder visited by Vikings

  • Nash Lucken, ten months old, of Winger, Minn., the son of Lori Lucken-Bak and Steven Bak, was diagnosed with a rare and severe hemolytic blood disorder when he was six weeks of age.
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  • It wasn't long ago that the people of Minnesota were contemplating the pros and cons of keeping the Vikings in Minnesota by building a new stadium for the franchise.
    People talked about the taxes the players paid to the state, the entertainment they brought and the exposure they brought to the state. You rarely heard anyone talk about all the volunteer work the Vikings do.
    Here's one.
    Nash Lucken, ten months old, of Winger, Minn., the son of Lori Lucken-Bak and Steven Bak, was diagnosed with a rare and severe hemolytic blood disorder when he was six weeks of age. His sister is Nevaeh, six, and his brother is Niles, two.
    Since that time Nash "potato," as the nurses call him, and his family must travel to University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital in Minneapolis to receive weekly to monthly blood transfusions, which is the only treatment for the disease which has no cure.
    Nash's mom, Lori Lucken-Bak, said they sometimes spend a week or two in the hospital for different things from sickness to surgeries.
    During one of Nash's visits he was visited by Vikings center John Sullivan and linebacker Tyrone McKenzie.
    Sullivan donated $150,000 and the Vikings organization donated another $50,000 for a new playground to be built at the hospital. The playground was named "Sullivan Playground" is his honor.
    There you go. The Vikings players don't just collect big fat paychecks and sit at home.
    If you would like to help Nash and his family, the Lions of Winger will be holding a pancake benefit Sunday, Feb. 27 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Winger City Hall.

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