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Crookston Times - Crookston, MN
  • ‘Twilight’ is a literary disaster

  • Film isn't so hot either.
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  •     Everyone follows a fad or trend of some kind in popular culture. They will come and go. Examples include the Harry Potter series and, oddly enough, Angry Birds. But the biggest of them that has had a consistent following for the past five years is the Twilight “saga.”
        Where do I even begin? I hate Twilight, with a passion. I don’t understand the hype of it. You can say that it’s because I’m not a teenage girl. That may be, but it goes further than that. I was actually given the first book for Christmas a few years ago by my younger brother Paul, back when the movies first came out. I was curious about all of the hype so I decided to give it a try. It took half a year to get to chapter 11 and I have yet to finish it. It was that boring. The literary style was mediocre and it just didn’t capture my attention like a good book should.
        I do read teenage-young adult fiction, but there’s something about this book that I didn’t get. For example, a quote in chapter 6: “The bouquets of brilliant anemones undulated ceaselessly in the invisible current, twisted shells scurried about the edges, obscuring the crabs within them, starfish stuck motionless to the rocks and each other, while one small black eel with white racing stripes wove through the bright green weeds, waiting for the sea to return.” I’m all for using adjectives, but there’s too much going on here. It’s basically a run-on sentence. And the whole book is filled with it. It is careless writing. I’m not sure what else can be said about it.
        If you don’t know the plot, it’s about a girl, Bella, who moves to Washington State and meets a strange boy in school, who makes it a habit to get her out of sticky situations. He soon reveals that he’s a vampire and she falls in love with him almost immediately, and I mean IN love. Uh, what? Isn’t there such a thing as dating first?     
        Infatuation is one thing, but being in love, wanting to spend the rest of your life with this one person you just met is completely juvenile. I’m not bashing a teen romance between a human and a vampire; on the contrary, I’ve come to enjoy the show Buffy the Vampire Slayer, where the slayer falls for two vampires over a course of seven seasons. It is more convincing than what is written in Twilight, and even more so, the movies.
    Page 2 of 2 -     The first movie came out in November 2007, and upon seeing the trailer, I rolled my eyes. There was this big buzz. But from what I saw just on commercials, I could tell it was poorly scripted, directed and acted. Yet somehow, girls everywhere started to follow it like a cult. Maybe it was because of pretty boys Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner as vampire Edward and werewolf Jacob, respectively. When I finally did catch a glimpse of the movie, I became skeptical. In the scene where Edward tells Bella about himself, it goes something like this: “Say it.” Bella responds, “Vampire.”
        Oh, the suspense! Delivery is flat. Also, chemistry is lacking between Kristen Stewart and Pattinson. Plus, the cinematography is terrible, the acting is terrible…everything about the movie is terrible. Still, people buy into lesser quality movies these days.
        The last installment, Breaking Dawn, Part 2, has now been released and, a week before the premiere, the lines at theaters started with mostly teemage girls, no less. These girls have school and they camp out at a movie theater for a week? Careless parenting, in my opinion.
         It’ll be so nice once the hoopla over Twilight is finished. We won’t have to see all the coverage of thousands of screaming girls or constantly hear how great it is when it really isn’t. Yeah, I have TV/movie obsessions of my own, but I show enthusiasm through courteous, intelligent conversation. The less fangirl squealing there is, the better.

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